Macon-to-Atlanta truck lanes would be unprecedented

March 9, 2016 Jackson - Motorists, including many trucks, travel on I-75 northbound to Atlanta as seen from the Barnesville-Jackson Road overpass in Jackson. While metro Atlantans will have to pay to use the interstate capacity planned for I-75, I-285, Ga. 400, the new truck-only lanes proposed for I-75 between Macon and Atlanta will add new capacity at no cost to the freight industry. Mandatory, tolled truck-only lanes have been proposed in Georgia before, as part of a grander vision for the express toll lanes now being constructed along I-75 and I-575 in Cobb and Cherokee Counties. HYOSUB SHIN / HSHIN@AJC.COM
View Caption Hide Caption
March 9, 2016 Jackson - Motorists, including many trucks, travel on I-75 northbound to Atlanta as seen from the Barnesville-Jackson Road overpass in Jackson. While metro Atlantans will have to pay to use the interstate capacity planned for I-75, I-285, Ga. 400, the new truck-only lanes proposed for I-75 between Macon and Atlanta will add new capacity at no cost to the freight industry. Mandatory, tolled truck-only lanes have been proposed in Georgia before, as part of a grander vision for the express toll lanes now being constructed along I-75 and I-575 in Cobb and Cherokee Counties. HYOSUB SHIN / HSHIN@AJC.COM
031316-trucks-only-HS01

March 9, 2016 Jackson – Motorists, including many trucks, travel on I-75 northbound to Atlanta as seen from the Barnesville-Jackson Road overpass in Jackson. While metro Atlantans will have to pay to use the interstate capacity planned for I-75, I-285, Ga. 400, the new truck-only lanes proposed for I-75 between Macon and Atlanta will add new capacity at no cost to the freight industry.  HYOSUB SHIN / HSHIN@AJC.COM

The $2 billion proposed truck lanes to be built on I-75 between Macon and McDonough will be the first of its kind in the United States.

The two barrier separated lanes — 40 miles of them — will be free for truckers to use, and they will go only in the northbound direction toward Atlanta. Truck traffic from the port of Savannah to Atlanta along I-16 and I-75 is expected to double or even triple in coming years.

Truck lanes exist on the New Jersey Turnpike, but there are some key differences. Cars are permitted to use the turnpike truck lanes, and all traffic is tolled.

Elsewhere in the country, there are a few short segments of truck lanes that are primarily used as bypasses or as connectors to or from a port. But nothing approaching the size and scope of what Georgia wants to build.

To read more about why the Georgia Department of Transportation is pursuing this unprecedented project, and staking $2 billion on its success, check out the in-depth and exclusive coverage of the issue in Sunday’s Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

READ MORE: Truck lanes for I-75 a $2 billion gamble.

 


View Comments 0